MSE Department Head Presents Research at Prestigious Lecture in South Korea

By Amanda Campanaro

Professor S. Pamir Alpay presents his research, titled “Accelerating Materials Deployment and Manufacturing via Multi-Scale Modeling and Genomics” as one of a select group of speaker’s at KIMM’s 40th anniversary and 3rd IFAME conference, Daejeon, South Korea.

Professor S. Pamir Alpay presents his research, titled “Accelerating Materials Deployment and Manufacturing via Multi-Scale Modeling and Genomics” as one of a select group of speaker’s at KIMM’s 40th anniversary and 3rd IFAME conference, Daejeon, South Korea.

Professor S. Pamir Alpay, UConn MSE Department Head, presented a lecture on “Accelerating Materials Deployment and Manufacturing via Multi-Scale Modeling and Genomics” at the 40 th year celebration of the Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) in Daejeon, South Korea August 18.

For its third year at South Korea’s KIMM, IFAME (International Forum on Advances in Mechanical Engineering) a one-day conference, convened in August 2016 where a select group of speakers from industry, academia, and research institutions across the world presented their research.

This year’s theme was “Mechanical Engineering and Global Sustainability,” according to the IFAME blog. As a national research institute, KIMM gathered professionals and researchers for one day to open up discussion and to stimulate technological innovation and create a fertile environment for convergence for manufacturing, as stated on the blog.

 “I had the keynote on materials,” says Dr. Alpay. “I was very honored to speak at this event. My talk was entitled ‘Accelerating Materials Deployment and Manufacturing via Multi-Scale Modeling and Genomics.’”

Dr. Alpay’s talk hinged on the “need for the development of comprehensive, multi-scale theoretical tools in the search for better materials,” as he states in his abstract. One talking point was that recent materials genomics/informatics initiatives seek to accelerate materials discovery through the use of computations across length and time scales.

Dr. Alpay provided three examples of accelerated materials development success stories from UConn MSE: self-healing metallic electrical contacts, a new generation of alloys for additive manufacturing, and high cooling capacity electrocaloric ceramics. The point was to provide the audience with recent developments in materials modeling and explain how this could help in the discovery of new materials.

“I think it was well received,” he says. “I knew KIMM was very good. I was amazed at the research capabilities that they have developed on nanomaterials, systems engineering, energy applications, and materials testing.”

Categories: conferences, faculty, news

Published: September 2, 2016

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